1.  Course number and name: CD 211 – Engineering Graphics 1

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: William T. Medalis, Dean Muccio

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year:

o        Graphics Technology, James H. Earle, 2005

o        Engineering Design with SolidWorks, Planchard & Planchard, 2010

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This basic course in engineering graphics coordinates and is taught simultaneously with  SolidWorks application. Board work covers geometric constructions, theory of orthographic projection, perspective and visualization, dimensioning, tolerancing, sections, assembly drawing, and geometric tolerancing. The course stresses aesthetics and technical sketching.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  N/A

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students are able to perform geometric constructions, lines, circles, etc.

           Students can draw orthographic projections

          Student can prepare a drawing with correct dimensional tolerances

          Students will understand interface between traditional methods and computer based operations for engineering graphics

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, h, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Introduction

          Perpendicular bisector

          Perpendicular from a point to a line

          Bisector of an angle

          Divide a line into equal parts

          Circle tangent to a circle & a line

          Circle tangent to two given circles

          Arc tangent to two straight lines

          Introduction to SolidWorks:

          File management.

          Circle thru 3 given points

          Ellipse construction - concentric circle method

          Lecture: orthographic projection

          1st angle vs. 3rd angle

          Identifying surfaces

          Part modeling: using sketch, extrude, hole wizard, and slots

          Review orthographic projection

          Lecture: Sketching

          Lecture: Scale a drawing

          Assembly Modeling: applying constraints, using Solidworks design library, using 3D Content Central.  Using revolve and repairing rebuild errors.

          Drawing creation: sheet properties and titleblock template, create standard views – orho, auxiliary, detail, and section. 

          Adding dimensions. 

          Creating Bill of Material.

          Sectioning

           Handout sectioning reference sheet

          Dimensioning

          Use design intent to improve model building skills. 

          Revolved cuts, dome, shell, and circular pattern functions.

          Design/Research Content Topic: Technique of dimensioning and tolerancing of parts with emphasis on understanding the function of the parts to minimize production costs.

      

This syllabus was prepared by: _W. Medalis and D. Muccio___________________       

 


1.  Course number and name: CH 11 – General Inorganic Chemistry I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: John R. Miecznikowski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Chemistry: The Central Science, Brown, T.L.; LeMay, Bursten , 2009

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Solutions to Red Exercises, Wilson, R.,  Chemistry:  The Central Science, 2009.

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This two-semester, sequential course covers atomic and molecular weights, the mole concept, Avogadros number, stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, the properties of gases, the electronic structures of atoms, periodic relationships among the elements, chemical bonding, geometrics of molecules, molecular orbitals, liquids, solids, intermolecular forces, solutions, rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, free energy, entropy, acids and bases, aqueous equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of some metals and nonmetals, and chemistry of coordination compounds.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: -

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Gaining Factual Knowledge

          Learning fundamental principles, generalizations, or theories

          Learning to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

6b. This course supports student outcomes: a.

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

           Course Introduction.

          Chemistry? Classifications

          Properties of Matter.

          Units of Measurement,

          Uncertainty in Measurement, and Dimensional Analysis

          Dimensional Analysis, Atomic Theory  and Atomic Structure

          Atomic Mass, Periodic Table , Molecules, Molecular Compounds, Ions and Ionic

          Compounds

          Inorganic Compounds and Some Simple Organic Compounds

          Chemical Equations

           Reactivity, and Formula Weights

          Information from Balanced Equations

          Acid-Base Reactions

          Chemical Analysis

          Thermodynamics, and Enthalpy

          The Wave Nature of Light

          Electron Configurations and the Periodic Table

          Sizes of Atoms

          Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids

          Chemical Bonds, Lewis Symbols

          Covalent Bonding

          Resonance Structures

          Molecular Shapes and the VSEPR Model

          Molecular Shape and Molecular Polarity

          Hybrid Orbitals and Multiple Bonds

          Characteristics of Gases, Pressure

          Design/Research Content Topic:

      

This syllabus was prepared by: John R. Miecznikowski


1.  Course number and name: CH 11L – General Inorganic Chemistry I Lab

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credit, 30 hours

3.  Instructors name: John R. Miecznikowski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year Laboratory Manual for Principles of General Chemistry, Beran J.A, 2009

4a. Other Supplemental Material: N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This lab offers the opportunity to explore and experience the rigors of an experimental physical science. Students make and record observations on simple chemical systems while learning fundamental laboratory manipulative and measurement skills. Experiments demonstrate and supplement concepts introduced in lecture. The first semester emphasizes weighing, filtering, titrating, using volumetric glassware, observing data, and recording and synthetic techniques. The second semester integrates these techniques in experimental procedures and explores physical properties and quantitative analysis of selected chemical systems.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: CH11

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Learning to apply course material (to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions)

          Developing specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to the course.

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b

7.    Brief List of Topics:

           SI Units

          Physical Properties

          Chemical Properties

          Acids and Bases

          Limiting Reactant

          A Volumetric Analysis

          Molecular Monolayer

          Chemistry of Copper

          Calorimetry

          Molar Mass of a Volatile Liquid

          Design/Research Content Topic: -

 

       This syllabus was prepared by: John R. Miecznikowski


1. Course Number and Name: CR 206 - Optical Communications Lab


2. Credits and contact hours:
1 credit hour, 45 contact hours


3. Instructors Name:
Dr. Sherman Poultney


4. Text:
Supplied Lab manual


4a. Other Supplemental Material:
Notes as needed


5a. Catalog Description:
Students use optical test equipment to measure the characteristics and applications of fiber optic cables, including simple communication systems. Fiber optic characteristics may include losses due to transmission, mismatch, and bending, optical fiber connections and splicing, and frequency response. Both in-lab computer assisted instruction and a textbook will be used to supplement the experiments.  Students prepare laboratory reports each week on their results.  One credit hour.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:
Prerequisites: PS 16 & PS 16L


5c. Require/Elective/Selective:
Elective


6a.Specific Outcomes:


OC1. Students will work with optical fibers and will characterize light sources
and photodetectors
OC2. Students will measure the characteristics of optical fibers, including band
width, attenuation, and bending losses to supplement CAI.
OC3. Students will measure pulse distortion and bit rates and how these affect the speed and accuracy of transmitted signals. A variety of modulation methods will be tested. Multiplexing methods will be introduced.


6b.This course supports ABET Criterion 3 student outcomes:
a,b,d,g,k


7. Brief List of Topics:


Introduction to Course (N)
Exp 1: Intro to Fiber Optics (N)
Exp 2: Fiber Optics Components (N)
Exp 3: Signal Transmission (N)
Exp 4: Fiber Optic Cable Connections (optional) (N)
Exp 5: Fiber Optic System Troubleshooting (N)
Exp 6: Transmission of Analog Signals over Fiber Optics
Exp 7: Operation and Characteristics of Optical Pulse Transmitter
Exp 8: Operation and Characteristics of Optical Pulse Receiver
Exp 9: Carrier Wave Modulation
Exp 10: Pulse Amplitude Modulation
Exp 11: Parallel to Serial Conversion
Exp 12: Digital Transmission and Reception
Exp 13: Analog to Digital Conversion
Final Lab Report Due

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman


1. Course number and name: CR 245 & CR 245L - Digital Design I &Lab

2. Credits and contact hours: 4 credits, 90 contact hours

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Digital Electronics with VHDL (Quartus II Version),

William Kleitz, , 2006, ISBN 0-13-171490-2

Lab Manual for Digital Electronics with VHDL (Quartus II Version) (Paperback) by Steve Waterman (Author) # ISBN-10: 0131715143

5a. Course Description:

Topics in this foundation course include basic digital design principles:  Boolean algebra, combinational logic design with gates, large scale integration, sequential logic design, registers, counters, memory, and programmable logic devices.  Students learn to write, implement, and simulate elementary digital circuits.  The course culminates by enabling students to design and implement finite-state machines.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: None

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

6a. Specific Outcomes:

Course Learning Goals and Course Learning Outcomes

No.

CLG

CLO

1

To understand the concepts of number systems and codes

Students will convert numbers from one base to another and will learn the basis for computer codes to designate numbers and letters.

2

To understand basic combinational logic circuits and how they are interconnected to perform logic functions

Students will be able to analyze and design combinational logic circuits directly from logic functions using Boolean algebra theorems and logic mapping.

3

To understand basic sequential logic circuits and how they are interconnected to perform logic functions.

Students will be able to analyze and design sequential logic circuits directly from logic functions using Boolean algebra theorems.

4

To understand the concepts and design of digital systems

Students will design simple digital computers.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k

7. Topics by week:

1. Number Systems and Codes.

2. Digital Electronic Signals and Switches.

3. Basic Logic Gates.

4. Programmable Logic Devices: FPGAs with VHDL Design.

5. Boolean Algebra and Reduction Techniques.

6. Exclusive-OR and Exclusive-NOR Gates.

7. Arithmetic Operations and Circuits.

8. Code Converters, Multiplexers, and Demultiplexers.

9. Logic Families and Their Characteristics.

10. Flip-Flops and Registers.

11. Practical Considerations for Digital Design.

12. Counter Circuits and VHDL State Machines.

13. Shift Registers.

14. Multivibrators and the 555 Timer.

15. Interfacing to the Analog World.

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 246 - Digital Design II

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits,  45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: VHDL Design Representation and Synthesis, Armstrong and Gray, 2000

and handouts, email, webpages.

5a. Course Description:

This course examines computer architecture implemented using a hardware design language and programmable logic devices. Students design, implement, and program small reduced-instruction-set-computer machines. Students understand central processing unit architecture and the VHDL language and implement and program a central processing unit.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CR 245

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

6a. Specific Outcomes:

Course Learning Goals:

G1:  Students will become proficient with HDL-based EDA tools

G2:  Students will understand FPGA and CPLD architectures. 

G3:  Students will learn the principles of Computer Architecture.

Outcomes:

OC1:  Students design and implement designs.

OC2:  Students use a variety of design techniques

OC3:  Students experiment with hardware co-design

OC4:  Students solve open-ended problems.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k


7. Topics by week:

1. Tutorial I and Review Of Logic Design Fundamentals -  / Boolean Algebra, Algebraic Simplification and Karnaugh Maps / Binary, Octal, Hex, BCD, Gray and ASCII Codes / Designing with NAND and NOR Gates / Multiplexers / Decoders / Flip-flops and Latches /  Synchronous Design / Tristate Logic and Busses.

 

2. Programmable Logic Technology/Intro to VHDL and GHDL

 

3. Intro to VHDL, the programming language

4. FPGA Development Board Hardware and I/O Features

5. FPGA Development Board Hardware and I/O Features

6. Sequential Design and Hierarchy

7. VHDL Library Functions

8. Midterm Exam

9. Using VHDL for Synthesis of Digital Hardware

10. State Machine Design

11. A Simple Computer Design

12. VGA Video Display Generation using FPGAs

13. Interfacing to the PS/2 Keyboard and Mouse

14. Legacy Digital I/O Interfacing Standards

15. Final Exam

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 310 - Voice and Signal Processing

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

 

4. Text book: Java Digital Signal Processing, by Douglas A. Lyon, 1997, Henry Holt/M&T Books.

 

5a. Course Description:

Overview of Digital Audio and its application Current state of streaming Audio on the Internet Digital Audio Processing Fundamentals. This course applies transform concepts and applied multi-media object-oriented programming. Students will apply the theories of Sampling, Spectra, Fast Fourier Transform Class, convolution and frequency space processing, compression and one-dimensional streaming. Students will apply the theories by creating programs that read processing and write audio streams. They are exposed to the elements of multi-media network delivery of data. They learn about a wide class of FFT algorithms and elementary sound synthesis. This course requires substantial programming effort and emphasis is place on good software engineering practices. Students will learn enough signal processing to take Image Processing, the follow-on course.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: (CS232 and either MA126 or MA172)  or permission of instructor.

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

6a. Specific Outcomes:

OC1. Students write a program to display waveforms on a software oscilloscope.

OC2. Students build realtime audio signal digitization and playback program in Java.

OC3. Students build realtime Java codec for a companded data source.

OC4. Students apply transform concepts in programs for signal processing.

OC5. Students write programs to perform constructive and destructive synthesis.

OC6. Students write programs to perform spectral analysis on arbitrary signals.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, b, c, e, g, k


7. Topics:

1. Mathematical principles of sampling and reconstruction, Fourier series.

2 .Mathematical principles of convolution, transforms and spectra, DFT, FFT.

3. Mathematical principles of LaPlace and z-transforms.

4. Window functions,  finite/infinite Impulse Response filters.

5. Overview of digital audio and its application, streaming audio on the Internet.

6. Object Oriented Java for Internet Signal Processing:  Exceptions/ Inner classes.

7. Object Oriented Java for Internet Signal Processing:           Threads/Streams/Files/GUIs

8. Digital audio processing Fundamentals, Sampling, Spectra             

9. AudioStreams and file formats/coding: doubleData, ulawData, u-law companding,

                  reading, writing, playing.

10. Constructive signal synthesis programming: Sinusoid, Triangle, Square, Sawtooth.

11. Spectral analysis programming: The discrete Fourier transform Class and inverse, fast

Fourier Transform Class and inverse. Power spectra,  Filtering using FFT.

12. Additive vs. Subtractive Synthesis and speech processing.

13. Frequency shifting using the FFT,  Delay, echo vs. reverb spectral impact.

14. Integrate speech I/O streaming, processing, compression and playback.

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 311 - Image Processing in Java

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Image Processing in Java, by Douglas A. Lyon, Prentice Hall, 1999

5a. Course Description:

A first course in Image Processing;  Image algebra,arithmetic operations,boolean operations, matrix operations,Achromatic and Colored Light, Selecting Intensities, Gamma Correction, Chromatic Color, psychophysics, Color models Color Space Conversion, low-level pattern recognition. Students will learn the theory of 2-D Fast Fourier Transform Class, 2D convolution and frequency space processing, compression and 2D streaming. Students will apply the theory by creating programs that read processing and write image streams. They are exposed to the elements of multi-resolution multi-media network streaming. They learn about a wide class of transforms, including Wavelets, DCT, the PFA FFT and others. This course requires substantial programming effort and emphasis is place on good software engineering practices. Students will learn enough signal processing to write their image processing applications.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CR310 or permission of instructor

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

 

OC1.     Students demonstrate the ability to utilize Java in practical image processing

 problems.

OC2       Students have deployed Java applications of their own design, on the web.

OC3.     Students build an image sequence processing application.

OC4.    Students make use of statistical analysis to optimize performance.

OC5.    Students implement convolution on images.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, k

 


7. Topics:

Digital Image Processing Fundamentals

Current state of streaming video on the Internet

Preview of Image processing

Reading and Writing Images: GIF, JPEG, PPM

Edge Detection

Boundary Processing

Image Enhancement Techniques

Achromatic and Colored Light

Color models (CIE, RGB, YUV, CMY, HSV, YIQ)

Thresholding techniques

Morphological filtering

Warping

The Cosine Transform

The InLine MPEG CODEC

The Wavelet Transform

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 311 - Image Processing in Java

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

 

4. Text book: Image Processing in Java, by Douglas A. Lyon, Prentice Hall, 1999

 

5a. Course Description:

A first course in Image Processing;  Image algebra,arithmetic operations,boolean operations, matrix operations,Achromatic and Colored Light, Selecting Intensities, Gamma Correction, Chromatic Color, psychophysics, Color models Color Space Conversion, low-level pattern recognition. Students will learn the theory of 2-D Fast Fourier Transform Class, 2D convolution and frequency space processing, compression and 2D streaming. Students will apply the theory by creating programs that read processing and write image streams. They are exposed to the elements of multi-resolution multi-media network streaming. They learn about a wide class of transforms, including Wavelets, DCT, the PFA FFT and others. This course requires substantial programming effort and emphasis is place on good software engineering practices. Students will learn enough signal processing to write their image processing applications.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CR310 or permission of instructor

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

 

OC1.     Students demonstrate the ability to utilize Java in practical image processing

 problems.

OC2       Students have deployed Java applications of their own design, on the web.

OC3.     Students build an image sequence processing application.

OC4.    Students make use of statistical analysis to optimize performance.

OC5.    Students implement convolution on images.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, k

 


7. Topics:

Digital Image Processing Fundamentals

Current state of streaming video on the Internet

Preview of Image processing

Reading and Writing Images: GIF, JPEG, PPM

Edge Detection

Boundary Processing

Image Enhancement Techniques

Achromatic and Colored Light

Color models (CIE, RGB, YUV, CMY, HSV, YIQ)

Thresholding techniques

Morphological filtering

Warping

The Cosine Transform

The InLine MPEG CODEC

The Wavelet Transform

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 325 - Computer Graphics

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

 

4. Text book: Java 3D Programming by Danial Selman, Manning Press, 2002,  ISBN 1-930110-35-9.

 

5a. Course Description:

This course is designed to support the visualization and computer systems domain. It is a unified introductory treatment to two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer graphics concepts. Topics include Human-computer interfaces using the AWT, applied geometry; homogeneous coordinate transforms; Bezier curves, Bernstein Basis Polynomials, Hermite Polynomials, B-Spline curve fitting. Rendering topics: z-buffer algorithm, painters algorithm, raytracing, and texture mapping.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: CS232 or permission of instructor.

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

 

OC1       Students apply transform concepts in programming situations            

OC2       Students demonstrate the ability to use high-performance graphics hardware

OC3       Students demonstrate the ability to utilize Java in practical visualization problems

OC4    Students write programs that display and manipulate 3D objects

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k

 


7. Topics:

 

1. Historical perspective and some fundamental issues in hardware, software and applications.

2. The use and implementation of Java 2D, a simple 2D graphics package.

3. Graphics hardware.

4. Transforms in the plane and 3-space, representation by matrices, homogeneous coordinates, 3D views.

5. Java 3D, a 3D floating-point hierarchical graphics package.

6. Human color-vision system, various color-description systems.

7.  Shaded graphics, aliasing

8. Visible-surface determination.

9. Illumination and shading, texture, shadows, transparency, reflections,

10. Image manipulations, scaling, shearing, rotation pixmaps. Image storage techniques.

11. Computer Animation.

12. physically based illumination models, .

13. ray tracing

14. radiosity

15. Java3D program with GUI.

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1. Course number and name: CR 346 - Computer Systems Architecture

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

 

4. Text book: Computer Architecture, A Quantitative Approach, 4th ed. Morgan Kaufmann

5a. Course Description:

An investigation into computer architectures (past, present and future). We will explore various hardware and software techniques designed to maximize parallelism and improve performance. Front-end design (branch prediction, instruction fetch, trace caches), HW/SW techniques of parallelism, Memory system design (caching, prefetching), Technology issues (low power, scaling, reliability, nanotechnology), multiprocessors.

 

Class will include a mix of lectures and discussions on assigned readings of recent publications. Students will be responsible for leading and participating in these discussions. A course project exploring a particular topic in depth will be required.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CR245 or permission of instructor

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

 

OC1 Students execute homework assignments from the chapter.

OC2 Students present various approaches to design

OC3 Students write compare and contrast papers on designs

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, g, k

 




7. Topics:

          Performance & Technology H&P Ch. 1

          x86 Programming H&P App.. J.3

          RISC vs. CISC Instruction Sets H&P App. B & J

          The Memory Hierarchy H&P Ch. 5

          Intro to Parallel Architecture H&P Ch. 4.1,

          Parallel Programming I CSG Ch. 2

          Parallel Programming II CSG Ch. 3 & 4

          Cache Coherence I H&P Ch. 4.2-4.3,

          Cache Coherence II H&P Ch. 4.4,

          Cache Coherence III H&P Ch. 4.4,

          Memory Consistency H&P Ch. 4.6

          TLS and Transactional Memory Handouts

          Recent Research on Architecture Handouts

          Synchronization H&P Ch. 4.5,

          Interconnection Networks H&P App. E

          Virtual Memory H&P Ch. 5.4, App. C.4-C.5

          Basic Pipelining H&P Ch. 2.1, App. A.1

          Pipelining Hazards H&P App. A.2-A.6

          Instruction-Level Parallelism H&P Ch. 2.2-2.10

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1.  Course number and name: CS 131 – Computer Programming I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Bama Govindaraja

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Java Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 4th Edition, D.S. Malik,  ISBN 1-4390-3566-0

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

          Java How to Program, Sixth Edition, Deitel & Deitel, Prentice Hall.

          Java for Programmers, Douglas Lyon, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004.

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course provides an overview of computer organization hardware, problem analysis-coding and execution cycle ,editing compiling ,running and debugging java programs using eclipse IDE .This course presents an introduction to the Software process  ,UML diagrams,basic swing concepts to create the Graphical User Interface, Applet structures , object-oriented programming concepts, problem specification and abstraction, data structures, The course presents programming applications including input/output, selection, repetition, arrays, user defined methods and classes

 

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: N/A

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes: The Student should be able to

 

1)      use Java tools including SKD, Eclipse, and UMLet.

 

2)       analyze the problem, design an algorithm, implement the algorithm in JAVA, and validate it following the software process.

 

3)      write interactive Java programs using GUI components..

 

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, k

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Computer hardware and Architecture

          High and Low level languages

          Compiling process

          JAVA tools and Eclipse IDE

          Understanding JDK,

          Coding Standard,

          How to use Eclipse: Workbenches, Editor and Views

          Java programming basics

          Introduction to Objects and Input/Output 

          Objects and Reference Variables

          Using Predefined Classes and Methods in a program

          Implementing Class

          Control Structures: Selection

          Relational operators

          Logical Operators

          Control Structures: Repetition

          Counter controlled,

          Sentinel controlled,

          UML and Object oriented design

          Software Process

          Introduction to UML

          UMLET,

          Basic Swing concepts,

          Understanding Object oriented programming

          Positioning the Frame On-Screen

          Applet and Application

          Event handling classes

          Arrays and Vector

          Declaring, accessing and printing single dimensional array elements

 

Design/Research Content Topic:

 

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Wook-Sung Yoo, Doug Lyon


1.  Course number and name: CS 132 – Computer Programming II

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Bama Govindaraja

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Java Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 4th Edition, D.S. Malik,  ISBN 1-4390-3566-0, 2009.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

          Java How to Program, Sixth Edition, Deitel & Deitel, Prentice Hall,2004

          Java for Programmers, Douglas Lyon, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004.

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course presents an over view of object oriented concepts, files handling in Java, Java net working, JDBC. This course also covers error handling, multi threading and advanced swing concepts.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: CS131 Computer Programming I

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes: The Student should be able to

 

4)      write interactive Java programs using the advanced swing concepts.

 

5)       write file handling and error handling in Java..

 

6)      make database connection, networking, and multi threading using Java application.

 

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes: a, b, c, e, g, k

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Inheritance

          Polymorphism

          Abstract classes and interfaces

          Wrapper classes and Strings

          Wrapper Classes: Boolean, character and Numeric wrapper classes,

          Strings,

          Handling Exceptions:

          Files Input/output

          Files Input/output II

          Binary File, Object Stream, Serialization

          JDBC in Java Application

          Advanced Swing

          Threads

          Multi threading

          Networking

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Bama Govindaraja / Wook-Sung Yoo


1.  Course number and name: CS 232 – Data Structures

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

3.  Instructors name: Phil LaMastra

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Dale, Joyce, and Weems, Object-Oriented Data Structures Using Java, 2nd ed., Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

          King, K. N., Java Programming From The Beginning, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.

 

5a. Catalog Description:  This course presents problem solving with abstract data types such as lists, linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees.  The course revisits recursion and discusses algorithm efficiency.  Time permitting, the course includes sorting, reachability, and minimal paths in graphs and their algorithms.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CS 132; co-requisite MA 231 or equivalent

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes: The Student should be able to

- use data structures and algorithms in sorting and searching

- perform fundamental algorithm analysis for various implementations

- select the best data structure based on analysis

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes: a, b, c, e, g, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Inheritance

          Polymorphism

          Abstract classes and interfaces

          Wrapper classes and Strings

          Wrapper Classes: Boolean, character and Numeric wrapper classes,

          Strings,

          Handling Exceptions:

          Files Input/output

          Files Input/output II

          Binary File, Object Stream, Serialization

          JDBC in Java Application

          Advanced Swing

          Threads

          Multi threading

          Networking

       This syllabus was prepared by: Bama Govindaraja / Wook-Sung Yoo           


1. Course number and name: ECE 431 - Biomedical Signal Processing

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Course Notes

 

5a. Course Description:  This course presents an overview of different methods used in biomedical signal processing. Signals with bioelectric origin are given special attention and their properties and clinical significance are reviewed. In many cases, the methods used for processing and analyzing biomedical signals are derived from a modeling perspective based on statistical signal descriptions. The purpose of the signal processing methods ranges from reduction of noise and artifacts to extraction of clinically significant features. The course gives each participant the opportunity to study the performance of a method on real biomedical signals.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: ( (CS131 or CS141 or SW408) and (MA126 or MA122) ) or permission of instructor

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

6a. Specific Outcomes:

OC1  Students synthesize biomedical signals

OC2  Students analyze biomedical signals

OC3  Students use a simple biomedical device

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, g, k

7. Topics:

Introduction
Confirmation Bias, Linear, stationary, normal - the stuff biology is not made of.
Linear systems
Impulse response
Discrete Fourier transform and z-transform
Convolution
Sampling
Random variables and stochastic processes
Random variables
Moments and Cumulants
Multivariate distributions
Statistical independence and stochastic processes
Examples of biomedical signal processing

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman


1. Course number and name: ECE 432 - Biomedical Imaging

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Image Processing in Java, Lyon, 1999.

5a. Course Description:

The course presents the fundamentals and applications of common medical imaging techniques, for example: x-ray imaging and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and optical imaging. In addition, as a basis for biomedical imaging, introductory material on general image formation concepts and characteristics are presented, including human visual perception and psychophysics.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: ECE 431 or ECE410 or CR310 or Permission of the instructor.

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

6a. Specific Outcomes:

OC1.     Students demonstrate the ability to implements a practical image processing program.

OC2.     Students build a detection program and deploy it on the web

OC3.     Students build an image sequence processing application

OC4.    Students make use of statistical analysis to optimize performance.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k

7. Topics:

Radiography

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Tomography

Ultrasound

Maximizing imaging procedure use

Creation of three-dimensional images

Compression of medical images

Non-diagnostic imaging

Archiving and recording

Open source software for medical image analysis

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 213 – Introduction to Electric Circuits

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Schaum's Outlines: Electric Circuits (4th Ed.), Nahvi & Edminster, 2003

o        http:// highered.mcgrawhill.com/classware/infoCenter.do?isbn=0073529559

 

5a. Catalog Description:

The course considers the fundamentals of the analysis of linear electric circuits.  The properties of the components that make up electrical circuits, including resistors, capacitors, inductors, voltage sources, and current sources are presented.  Both independent and dependent sources are considered.  The Kirchhoff current and voltage laws are applied to electrical networks to determine voltages and currents at all points in the network.  Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits are also introduced.  Circuit behavior is analyzed for DC and transient excitation.  First and second order differential equations with constant coefficients are applied to the transient case to achieve the solution.  AC analysis is then introduced using the concept of Phasors.

 

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: MA 126 Calculus II , PS 16 +L Physics II + Lab (Prereqs.)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will derive expressions for voltage and current based on the fundamental laws of Physics and will use these expressions to develop models for electric circuits

          Students will develop methods of analyzing electric circuits using Kirchhoffs voltage and current laws, including mesh and node equations and Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits

          Students will develop electric circuit models for inductors and capacitors and use those models to analyze electric circuits containing these elements

          Students will develop methods of analyzing RLC circuits under transient conditions using first- and second-order differential equations

          Students will develop electric circuit models for components excited by sinusoidal sources and will be introduced to using those models to analyze electric circuits

          Students will simulate circuits using Multisim and will use Matlab to analytically solve circuit analysis problems.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, k

 

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Charge, Current and Voltage

          Matlab / PSpice

          Ohms law, Resistance

          Kirchoffs Laws

          Analysis Methods

          Thevenin & Norton

          Intro to Op-Amps

          Capacitors

          Inductors

          First Order Transients

          Second Order Trans

          AC Fundamentals

          The Impedance Concept

          Design/Research Content Topic: Students design either a D/A converter, an Instrumentation amplifier, or an analog circuit simulation of a shock absorber.  They define the exact specifications and then find the best method to meet those requirements.  They must show analytical calculation and circuit simulation.  They are given the option to build a hardware prototype. 

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 213L – Electric Circuits Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Computer Simulated Experiments for Electric Circuits Using Electronic Workbench Multisim, Richard H. Berube

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Electronic Test Instruments Theory and Applications, Robert A. Witte

o        Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

 

5a. Catalog Description:

 

Students use common electrical laboratory instruments (oscilloscopes, meters, and signal generators) and elemental circuit components to construct and analyze basic electrical circuits. They study the application of circuit theorems and circuit elements (RL and RC). Experiments are conducted with transient, steady state and frequency response. Software applications such as Electronic Workbench Multisim and Pspice are used.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213 (Co-requisite)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Voltage and Current in DC Circuits.

          Ohm's Law — Resistance.

          Electrical Power in DC Circuits.

          Resistors in Series — Kirchhoff's Voltage Law.

          Resistors in Parallel — Kirchhoff's Current Law.

          Series-Parallel Circuits.

          Voltage and Current Divider Rules.

          Nodal Voltage Circuit Analysis.

          Mesh Current Circuit Analysis.

          Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits.

          Loading Effects of DC Instruments.

          The Oscilloscope and Function Generator.

          Capacitance — Series and Parallel Capacitors.

          Charging and Discharging Capacitors.

          Inductance — Series and Parallel Inductors.

          Transients in Inductors.

          Transients in RLC Circuits.

          Voltage and Current in AC Circuits—RMS.

          Inductive Reactance.

          Capacitive Reactance.

          Impedance of Series AC Circuits.

          Admittance of Parallel AC Circuits.

          Power and Power Factor in AC Circuits.

          Nodal Analysis in AC Circuits.

          Second Order Trans

          AC Fundamentals

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ___C. Craciun_________________        


1.  Course number and name: EE 213L – Electric Circuits Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Computer Simulated Experiments for Electric Circuits Using Electronic Workbench Multisim, Richard H. Berube

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Electronic Test Instruments Theory and Applications, Robert A. Witte

o        Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

 

5a. Catalog Description:

 

Students use common electrical laboratory instruments (oscilloscopes, meters, and signal generators) and elemental circuit components to construct and analyze basic electrical circuits. They study the application of circuit theorems and circuit elements (RL and RC). Experiments are conducted with transient, steady state and frequency response. Software applications such as Electronic Workbench Multisim and Pspice are used.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213 (Co-requisite)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Voltage and Current in DC Circuits.

          Ohm's Law — Resistance.

          Electrical Power in DC Circuits.

          Resistors in Series — Kirchhoff's Voltage Law.

          Resistors in Parallel — Kirchhoff's Current Law.

          Series-Parallel Circuits.

          Voltage and Current Divider Rules.

          Nodal Voltage Circuit Analysis.

          Mesh Current Circuit Analysis.

          Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits.

          Loading Effects of DC Instruments.

          The Oscilloscope and Function Generator.

          Capacitance — Series and Parallel Capacitors.

          Charging and Discharging Capacitors.

          Inductance — Series and Parallel Inductors.

          Transients in Inductors.

          Transients in RLC Circuits.

          Voltage and Current in AC Circuits—RMS.

          Inductive Reactance.

          Capacitive Reactance.

          Impedance of Series AC Circuits.

          Admittance of Parallel AC Circuits.

          Power and Power Factor in AC Circuits.

          Nodal Analysis in AC Circuits.

          Second Order Trans

          AC Fundamentals

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ___C. Craciun_________________        


1.  Course number and name: EE 213L – Electric Circuits Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Computer Simulated Experiments for Electric Circuits Using Electronic Workbench Multisim, Richard H. Berube

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Electronic Test Instruments Theory and Applications, Robert A. Witte

o        Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

 

5a. Catalog Description:

 

Students use common electrical laboratory instruments (oscilloscopes, meters, and signal generators) and elemental circuit components to construct and analyze basic electrical circuits. They study the application of circuit theorems and circuit elements (RL and RC). Experiments are conducted with transient, steady state and frequency response. Software applications such as Electronic Workbench Multisim and Pspice are used.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213 (Co-requisite)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will demonstrate their knowledge of electrical and electronics components.

          Students will demonstrate their ability to troubleshoot electrical systems.

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data.

          Students demonstrate use an appropriate format for preparing lab reports.

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results.

          Students will demonstrate their ability to combine theory with simulation and real design of circuits.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Voltage and Current in DC Circuits.

          Ohm's Law — Resistance.

          Electrical Power in DC Circuits.

          Resistors in Series — Kirchhoff's Voltage Law.

          Resistors in Parallel — Kirchhoff's Current Law.

          Series-Parallel Circuits.

          Voltage and Current Divider Rules.

          Nodal Voltage Circuit Analysis.

          Mesh Current Circuit Analysis.

          Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits.

          Loading Effects of DC Instruments.

          The Oscilloscope and Function Generator.

          Capacitance — Series and Parallel Capacitors.

          Charging and Discharging Capacitors.

          Inductance — Series and Parallel Inductors.

          Transients in Inductors.

          Transients in RLC Circuits.

          Voltage and Current in AC Circuits—RMS.

          Inductive Reactance.

          Capacitive Reactance.

          Impedance of Series AC Circuits.

          Admittance of Parallel AC Circuits.

          Power and Power Factor in AC Circuits.

          Nodal Analysis in AC Circuits.

          Second Order Trans

          AC Fundamentals

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ___C. Craciun_________________        


1.  Course number and name: EE 213L – Electric Circuits Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Computer Simulated Experiments for Electric Circuits Using Electronic Workbench Multisim, Richard H. Berube

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Electronic Test Instruments Theory and Applications, Robert A. Witte

o        Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

 

5a. Catalog Description:

 

Students use common electrical laboratory instruments (oscilloscopes, meters, and signal generators) and elemental circuit components to construct and analyze basic electrical circuits. They study the application of circuit theorems and circuit elements (RL and RC). Experiments are conducted with transient, steady state and frequency response. Software applications such as Electronic Workbench Multisim and Pspice are used.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213 (Co-requisite)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Voltage and Current in DC Circuits.

          Ohm's Law — Resistance.

          Electrical Power in DC Circuits.

          Resistors in Series — Kirchhoff's Voltage Law.

          Resistors in Parallel — Kirchhoff's Current Law.

          Series-Parallel Circuits.

          Voltage and Current Divider Rules.

          Nodal Voltage Circuit Analysis.

          Mesh Current Circuit Analysis.

          Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits.

          Loading Effects of DC Instruments.

          The Oscilloscope and Function Generator.

          Capacitance — Series and Parallel Capacitors.

          Charging and Discharging Capacitors.

          Inductance — Series and Parallel Inductors.

          Transients in Inductors.

          Transients in RLC Circuits.

          Voltage and Current in AC Circuits—RMS.

          Inductive Reactance.

          Capacitive Reactance.

          Impedance of Series AC Circuits.

          Admittance of Parallel AC Circuits.

          Power and Power Factor in AC Circuits.

          Nodal Analysis in AC Circuits.

          Second Order Trans

          AC Fundamentals

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ___C. Craciun_________________        


1.  Course number and name: EE 221 – Frequency Domain Circuit Analysis

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, Charles Alexander & Matthew Sadiku, 2009

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Schaum's Outlines: Electric Circuits (4th Ed.), Nahvi & Edminster, 2003

o        http:// highered.mcgrawhill.com/classware/infoCenter.do?isbn=0073529559

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Students perform frequency domain analysis of passive and active circuits, study transient and AC circuit analysis manually and with computer-aided applications, and examine the transient response of first and second order circuits. The course introduces pole and zero concepts and applies them to circuit analysis and introduces computer methods of circuit analysis and design.  

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: MA 227 Calculus III, EE213 Intro to Electric Circuits

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will develop the math skills to analyze linear circuits.

          Students will be able to use basic time and frequency domain analysis (differential equations, Laplace transform) in analysis.

          Students will be able to design simple linear circuits for basic applications.

          Students will solve many problems using software tools such as PSpice or MultiSIM, and Matlab to aid in both analysis and design of circuits, and will compare to analytical solutions by hand.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, k

 


 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Introduction, Review Course 1

          2nd Order Transients (RLC)

          Sinusoids and Phasors, Phasor Diagrams, and Circuit Elements

          Sinusoidal Steady-State Analysis

          Sinusoidal Steady-State Analysis AC Power

          Three-Phase Circuits ("Polyphase")

          Mutual Inductance (Transformers)

          Frequency Response

          Introduction to Fourier Series

          Introduction to Laplace Transforms

          Circuits and Transfer Functions

          Active Filters (Time Permitting)

 

Design/Research Content Topic: Students design a bandpass filter to meet specifications.  They define the exact specifications and then find the best method to meet those requirements.  They must show analytical calculation and circuit simulation.  They are given the option to build a hardware prototype. 

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE231 Introduction to Electronics Circuits and Devices

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Pradeep Govil

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year:

Introduction to Electronic Circuits Design, Richard R. Spencer & Mohammed S. Ghausi, John Wiley & Sons Inc, ISBN 0-201-36183-

4a. Other Supplemental Material: N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This is the first course in active and non-linear electronics. Basic principles and technologies to understand, analyze and design electronic circuits will be taught. Electronic device models are described and used in the analysis of circuits using diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) and Field Effect Transistors (FET).  Amplifier biasing techniques are presented and analyzed with respect to power efficiency and circuit stability. H-Parameter models are used for low frequency, small signal analysis of Linear Amplifiers. Digital Electronics Circuits, including Gate level & Transistor level Digital Circuits design, are introduced.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213 ( Prerequisite)

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

Students will be able to analyze and design biasing circuits for amplifiers and relate it to the given requirements.

Students will be able to design BJT and FET circuits for a given application to meet performance requirements

Students will learn to develop AC equivalent circuits to help in analysis of the amplifier circuits both for BJT and FET

Students will learn to use small signal AC equivalent ckts in the frequency analysis of transistor amplifiers and evaluation of their performance


6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, d, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

Electronics Circuit Design

Semiconductor Physics & Electron Devices

Small Signal Linearity & Amplification

Small Signal Linearity & Amplification

DC Biasing

DC Biasing

Low frequency Small Signal AC Analysis & Amplifiers

 

Low frequency Small Signal AC Analysis & Amplifiers

Amplifier Frequency Response

Amplifier Frequency Response

Gate Level Digital circuits

Transistor Level Digital Circuits

Transistor Level Digital Circuits

          Technical Discussions

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

This syllabus was prepared by: __Pradeep Govil__________________


1.  Course number and name: EE 231LElectronics I Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Christian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year:

 

1 Computer Simulated Experiments for Electric Circuits Using Electronic Workbench Multisim, Richard H. Berube, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-048788-0

 

2  Electronic Test Instruments Theory and Applications, Robert A. Witte First Edition, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-253147-X

3.    "Policies and Procedures Manual for Electrical Engineering Laboratory Course", School of Engineering, 2008

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

Reference Books:

1.    Lab Manual for EE 213

2.    NIDA Lab/Text Manual, Nida Corp

5a. Catalog Description:

Students build and test circuits using diodes, bipolar transistors, and MOSFETS.  They use the principles developed in EE 231 to build and test amplifier and oscillator circuits

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 213  ( Prerequisite)EE 231 Corequisite

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will demonstrate their knowledge of electrical and electronics components.

          Students will demonstrate their ability to troubleshoot electrical systems.

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data.

          Students demonstrate use an appropriate format for preparing lab reports.

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results.

          Students will demonstrate their ability to combine theory with simulation and real design of circuits.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, d, k


7.    Brief List of Topics:

Introduction. General information. Laboratory Process, Practice and Procedure. Instruments familiarization.

Voltage and Current in DC Circuits.

Ohm's Law — Resistance.

Electrical Power in DC Circuits.

Resistors in Series — Kirchhoff's Voltage Law.

Resistors in Parallel — Kirchhoff's Current Law.

Series-Parallel Circuits.

Voltage and Current Divider Rules.

Nodal Voltage Circuit Analysis.

Mesh Current Circuit Analysis.

Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits.

Loading Effects of DC Instruments.

The Oscilloscope and Function Generator.

Capacitance — Series and Parallel Capacitors.

Charging and Discharging Capacitors.

Inductance — Series and Parallel Inductors.

Transients in Inductors.

Transients in RLC Circuits.

Voltage and Current in AC Circuits—RMS.

Inductive Reactance.

Capacitive Reactance.

Impedance of Series AC Circuits.

Admittance of Parallel AC Circuits.

Power and Power Factor in AC Circuits.

Nodal Analysis in AC Circuits.

Mesh Analysis in AC Circuits.

Thevenin Equivalent for AC Circuits

Transformers

          Technical Discussions

Design/Research Content Topic:

 

This syllabus was prepared by: _Christian Craciun___________________        


1.  Course number and name: EE 301 – Signals & Systems I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Linear Systems and Signals, 2nd ed., B. P. Lathi,

Oxford University Press, 2005.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

Schaums Outlines: Signals and Systems, Hwei P. Hsu, McGraw-Hill, 1995.

5a. Catalog Description:

This course analyzes continuous signals and systems utilizing frequency domain techniques which include the Fourier series, Fourier Transform and Laplace transforms.  Included are the important properties and identities of these of these techniques which include convolution, impulse response, transfer function and others.  The student will gain insight into the duality between the time and frequency domains and techniques for modeling Linear Time Invariant (LTI) systems.

 

Since no real system is noise free, the course will discuss the various types and sources of noise, as well as the impact of noise on LTI systems. 

 

Sampling theory will be discussed as a bridge to discrete time systems.  Discrete time systems will be studied with the z-transform and discrete Fourier transform.  MATLAB will be used as a tool to aid in understanding concepts and solving problems.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE221 Frequency Domain Circuit Analysis

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will analyze LTI systems with differential equations as well as Fourier and Laplace Transforms.

          Student will apply Laplace transforms to real world engineering problems.

          Students will learn the Fourier series as if they were the original inventor.

          Student will apply Fourier Transforms to real world engineering problems.

          Students will analyze the different noise sources and their effects on LTI systems.

          Students will apply the z-transform and discrete Fourier analysis to engineering problems.

          Students will use MATLAB to aid in solving all types of signals and systems problems, especially matrix based systems.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, k


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Course Introduction

          Review of Mathematical Concepts

          Intro to MATLAB

          Signals and Systems + noise

          Time Domain Analysis of continuous 

          Laplace Transform

          Fourier Series

          Fourier Transform

          Sampling

          Discrete Signals

          Z-Transform

          Discrete Fourier Analysis

          State Space analysis

          Design/Research Content Topic: none

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 315 – Nanoelectronics I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics, by George W. Hanson

Pearson/ Prentice Hall (2009)

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Building on the two introductory courses in nanotechnology, this course is the first of two that describe how nanotechnology can be integrated in to the electronics industry.  The unique electrical mechanical and optical properties of structures in the nanometer range and how they may be applied to electronics products are discussed.  Principles of electronic materials, semiconductor devices, and microfabrication techniques will be extended to the nanoscale.  Students will increase their knowledge of electronic structure and the behavior of optoelectronic and low-dimensional systems.  Students make extensive use of the available literature to seek out potential applications of nanotechnology.  Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology – Nanoelectronics track. Also open to interested graduate students in ECE.  Lecture course.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE213 and EG212 (prereq) or permission of instructor

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will solve mathematical models describing the behavior of quantum mechanical and solid state physics of bulk materials

          Students will mathematically examine the effects of reducing electronic materials to the nanoscale

          Students will survey the available literature and will write and present reports on topics assigned by the instructor

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, g, i, j

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Introduction to Nanoelectronics

          Classical Particles, Classical Waves, & Quantum Particles

          Quantum Mechanics of Electrons

          Free and Confined Electrons

          Band Theory of Solids

          Optoelectronics

          Tunnel Junctions and Applications

          Coulomb Blockade and SET

          Density of States

          Semiconductor Quantum Wells/Wires/Dots

          Fabrication Techniques

          Semi/Classical/Ballistic Transport

          Nanotubes/Nanowires/Spintronics

          Presentations

          Design/Research Content Topic: Student teams research a product of interest in nanoelectronics and prepare a 30 minute presentation for the class on their topic.

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 316 – Nanoelectronics II

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: none required

4a. Other Supplemental Materials: Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics, by George W. Hanson

Pearson/ Prentice Hall (2009)

Solid State Electronic Devices 6th ed., by B.G. Streetman and S.K. Banerjee, Prentice Hall (2005)

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This second course in Nanoelectronics emphasizes present and potential applications of nanotechnology in the various fields of next-generation electronics.  The course will discuss topics relevant to electromagnetism at the nanoscale, MEMS/NEMS, nanosensors, nano-optics, molecular electronics, and nanoelectronic interfaces with biology.  Student teams will survey the available literature and companies involved in designing and manufacturing devices with nanoelectronics as a core to select a product for analysis in terms of technical and economic advantages, and present their findings.  Teams of students also conceptualize a potential product, and perform the same analysis.  Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology – nanoelectronics track.  Also open to interested graduate students in ECE.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE315 (prereq.) or permission of instructor

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will solve mathematical models describing the behavior of electrons, photons, and related  physics of semiconductor devices

          Students will examine the effects of reducing electronic devices to the nanoscale

          Students will survey the available literature and will write and present reports on topics assigned by the instructor

          Students will design a new product based on some aspect of nanotechnology and will perform feasibility analyses. 


6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, e, g, i, j

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Intro

          Electromagnetics

          Device Fabrication

          Semiconductor Devices

          MEMS/NEMS

          Plasmonics

          Nanosensors

          NO CLASS – Mar 21, 24 SPRING BREAK

          Neuroelectronics

          Packaging/Interfacing

          Research & Development

          Product Launch

          Design/Research Content Topic: Student teams research a product of interest in nanoelectronics and prepare a 30 minute presentation for the class on their topic.  They also design a nanoelectronics product concept and prepare a 30 minute presentation for the class on their design. 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 331 Analog Electronics Design

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Pradeep Govil

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year:

Introduction to Electronic Circuits Design, Richard R. Spencer & Mohammed S. Ghausi

John Wiley & Sons Inc

ISBN 0-201-36183-3

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

1.       Schaum's Outline of Probability, Random Variables, and Random Processes, Second Edition,

Schaum's Outlines, McGraw-Hill 2003,

ISBN 0-07-0140228-4

2.       Schaum's Outline of Electronic Devices and Circuits, Second Edition

Schaum's Outlines, McGraw-Hill 2002,

ISBN 0-07-136270-3

3.       Schaum's Outline of Electric Circuits Schaum's Outlines, McGraw-Hill 2003,

ISBN 0-07-139307-2

4.       Microelectronic Circuits: Analysis & Design, 2nd Edition

ISBN-13: 9780495667728

1100 Pages | 2010

5a. Catalog Description:

This advanced course in electronics examines high frequency response of bipolar junction transistor and field effect transistor amplifiers using hybrid two port active device models. Students consider the effect of feedback and frequency compensation techniques on the amplifier response and study a variety of analog circuits with respect to their analysis and applications, including active filters, oscillators, waveform generation and shaping, voltage regulator, communication circuits. The course also introduces Large Signal AC Analysis of Power amplifier circuits.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 231 ( Prerequisite)

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

Students will be able to analyze and design Op Amp application circuits.

Students will be able to analyze feedback in basic amplifier circuits and  understand basic design of Compensation circuits

Students will learn filter types, their design and way to analyze their performance.

Students will learn types of power amplifiers and ways to evaluate and analyze their performance

Students will learn to analyze and evaluate simple data converters

Students will be able to Apply Worst Case Analysis and Parameter Variation to evaluate circuit designs

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes a, b, c, d, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          DFM-Design For Manufacturing, Circuit Performance Evaluations, Monte Carlo Analysis, Introduction to Electronic Design, Introduction To Operational Amplifiers And Applications, Frequency Dependant Op Amp Circuits and Non-Linear Op Amp Circuits, Non-Ideal Characteristics of Op Amps, Low Frequency large- Signal AC Analysis-Diode Circuits, Low Frequency large- Signal AC Analysis- , Low Frequency large- Signal AC Analysis-Outputs Stages- Power Amplifiers, -Discuss and select Study Report Topics , Subjects, Feedback & Compensation Circuits, , Feedback & Compensation Circuits, Oscillators, Filters , Filters & Applications, Integrated Ckt. , Data Converters & Integrated Ckt. And Applications, -Study Report and Class Presentation due, Introduction to Digital Electronics, Technical Discussions

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

This syllabus was prepared by: _Pradeep Govil___________________


1.  Course number and name: EE 331L  Electronics II Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Paul Botosani

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: .        

1.  Electronic Test Instruments: 2nd Ed. by Robert A. Witte, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2002, ISBN 0-13-066830-3

2.    Computer Simulated Experiments for Electronic Devices Using Electronics Workbench (3rd Ed.) by Richard H. Berube, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 2004, ISBN 0-13-048784-8

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

Reference Books:

1.    Analog Circuits NIDA Lab/Text Manual, Nida Corp

2.    "Pencilbox Logic Designer", E & L Manual, E & L Instruments, Inc.

3.    "Operational Amplifiers" NIDA Lab/Text Manual, Nida Corp

5.    "Introduction to Filters" NIDA Lab/Text Manual, NIDA Corp

6.    "Analog Circuits Trainer ACT-1", E & L Manual, E & L Instruments, Inc.

Software

1.    Microsoft Excel, version 2001 or higher

2.    MathCad, version 8.0 or higher, Student Ed, Anderson, Addison Wesley

3.    MatLab, version 6 or higher, Student Ed, Prentice-Hall or classroom kid

4.    Orcad, Pspice, version 8 or higher, (obtained from MicroSim web site)

5.    Electronics Workbench, version 2001 or greater, Interactive Image Technology, student version

6.    NIDA, computer Assisted Instructions

7.    PICO, Virtual Instruments

8.    NI ELVIS II+ Hardware and Software


5a. Catalog Description:

This advanced lab provides insight into the functions of various application-specific electronic circuits. Experiments characterize functioning of various analog systems such as oscillators, active filters, waveform generators and shaping circuits, and voltage regulator circuits.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE 221 ( Prerequisite) EE 331 Corequisite

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

 6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will work various analog systems and will build circuit using them.

          Students will learn to troubleshoot analog systems.

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data.

          Students use an appropriate format for preparing lab reports.

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, d, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Half-Wave Rectifier, Full-Wave Rectifier, Bridge Rectifier, Rectifier Filters, Differential Amplifiers, Operational Amplifiers., Noninverting Voltage Amplifier, Inverting Voltage Amplifier, Op-Amp Comparators, Op-Amp Summing Amplifier, Op-Amp Integrator and Differentiator, Low-Frequency Amplifier Response, High-Frequency Amplifier Response, Op-Amp Frequency Response, Low-Pass Active Filters., High-Pass Active Filters, Band-Pass Active Filters, Band-Stop (Notch) Active Filters, Wien-Bridge Oscillator, Colpitts Oscillator, Astable Multivibrator, Hartley Oscillato, RC Phase Shift Oscillator, FET Crystal Oscillator, Sawtooth Oscillator, SCR Trigger Circuits, SCR Power Control Circuits, Monte Carlo Analysis, Technical Discussions

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

This syllabus was prepared by: _Paul Botosani___________________ 


1. Course number and name: EE 346 and Lab - Embedded Microcontrollers

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 4 credits, 90hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Gino Lopes

 

4. Text book:  Programming Interactivity: A Designer's Guide to Processing, Arduino, and Openframeworks (9780596154141): Joshua Noble, 2009.

5a. Course Description:

This course covers the architecture of microcontrollers, including how they are constructed internally and how they interface with external circuitry.  Applications for microcontrollers in both complex and simple equipment are discussed. Students learn how to apply and how to select a microcontroller for a given application. An accompanying laboratory course covers the programming of microprocessors to do a specific task. This course covers the programming and application of the microcontroller. These tools are used to develop software code for practical applications such as motor speed control and voltage regulation for power supplies.

This laboratory covers the basic operation and applications of a microcontroller. Students learn to program a microcontroller to control applications such as motor speed by the use of an emulator connected to a PC. They design a circuit using a microcontroller for a specific application and write a program to control the circuit. On completion of the program, they use the emulator to program an actual microcontroller for use in their circuit.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite CR 245

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required


6a. Specific Outcomes:

Course Learning Goals and Course Learning Outcomes

No.

Objective

Outcome

1

To learn the architecture of microcontrollers

 

Students will be able to describe the architecture of a microcontroller needed to perform a certain task

2

To learn how microcontrollers are programmed

Students will write programs for microcontrollers in machine language

3

To learn how information is stored and interfaced with other components

Students will be able to send and retrieve information from the memory of the microcontroller

4

To learn about applications of microcontroller

Students will be able to select a microcontroller to perform a specific task

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, b, c, e, k

7. Topics:

Microprocessor and Microcontroller Fundamentals

Microcontroller Architecture

Programming and Problem Solving

Introduction to Data Copy (Move), Arithmetic, and Branch Instructions

Introduction to Logic, Bit manipulation, and Multiply - Divide Operations

Stack and Subroutines

Application Programs and Software Design

Input/Output (I/O) Ports and Interfacing I

Interrupts andTimers

Serial I/O

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman


1.  Course number and name: EE 350 – Analog Communication Systems

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Modern Electronic Communication (9th ed.) Jeffrey S. Beasley & Gary M. Miller.  Pearson / Prentice Hall. (2008)

 

5a. Catalog Description:

The course focuses on analog communication systems and the effects of noise on those systems, developing modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation and pulse code). It discusses dealing with non-linear system elements and presents a mathematical treatment of the effects of various noise sources on these systems. Historical design studies and topics in communication applications permit students to apply these concepts to meet system requirements. The course clarifies important concepts through simulation of modulation techniques on multimedia computing systems.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE301 Signals & Systems I

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will develop block diagrams for and develop specifications for communication systems

          Students will design and analyze basic communication circuits, such as amplifiers, modulators, and oscillators.

          Students will develop circuit models for noise generation and will them to analyze the effect of noise on analog circuits

           

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c, j, k

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Introductory Topics

          Amplitude Modulation: Transmission

          Amplitude Modulation: Reception

          Single-Sideband Communications

          Frequency Modulation: Transmission

          Frequency Modulation: Reception

          Communication Techniques

          Digital Communications: Coding Techniques

          Transmission Lines

          Wave Propagation

          Antennas

          Waveguides and Radar

          Television

          Selected Topics

          Design/Research Content Topic: none

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EE 352 – Digital Communications

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications, 2nd ed. by Bernard Sklar, Prentice Hall (2001)

 

5a. Catalog Description: This course is designed to explore current digital communications features, including network communications between computers. It includes discrete time signals and systems, Z-transforms, discrete Fourier transforms, fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and random signals. Fundamentals of sampling principles and channel coding are utilized to develop common baseband and digital modula­tion techniques (ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation). Transmission over bandwidth constrained channels, and signal detection and extraction. Multiplexing and multiple access networks are also analyzed. The lecture material is illustrated with practical examples.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EE301 Signals & Systems I

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Students will develop block diagrams for and develop specifications for communication systems

          Students will analyze and implement digital modulation, source, and channel coding.

          Students will develop models for error detection and correction and will them to apply them to digital communication systems

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, c

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Intro to Signals & Spectra

          Formatting and Baseband Modulation

          Baseband Demodulation/Detection

          Bandpass Modulation, Demodulation/Detection

          Communications Link Analysis

          Channel Coding

          Modulation & Coding Trade-offs

          Synchronization

          Spread-Spectrum Techniques

          Design/Research Content Topic: none

 

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      


1.  Course number and name: EG 31Fundamentals of Engineering 1

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Jeffrey N. Denenberg

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Exploring Engineering, Kosky/Wiss/Balmer/Keat, 2010

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This two-course sequence provides core knowledge and competencies in engineering and computer science to engineering students in their first year. Topics include computer-based computational skills, principles of engineering design and software design, digital logic and programming, laboratory data acquisition and reporting, along with probability and statistical analysis of data, design analysis techniques, implementation of engineering projects. In EG 32, hands-on team projects are core learning experiences. They are structured to introduce students to the implementation of principles of design and engineering methodologies, system engineering management, and presentation skills. Guest presenters and field trips augment these courses, which are taught by interdisciplinary faculty teams.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Co-requisites: PS 15, PS 16

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Select or confirm choice of an engineering or non-engineering academic major

          Judge professional actions as ethical or unethical based on codes of engineering ethics

          Assess the importance of being professionally licensed in chosen engineering field

          Maintain a portfolio of Reflections on his/her learning process

          Calculate current flows and voltage drops in an electrical circuit represented by a schematic diagram

          Represent a set of simultaneous linear equations in matrix form and solve using Matlab

          Predict the output of a digital logic circuit represented by a gate symbol diagram

          Construct and test functional experimental electrical and digital circuits

          Prepare a lab report that clearly communicates the principles, procedures, and results of experiments and tests

          Prepare a table of data and analyze it using Excel

          Write a discussion or report using Word

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, d, e, g, k, i

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Units, Equations and the Physical World

          Setting the Stage: Fund. Of Engineering. and CS

          Probability & Statistics for Engineering (Excel)

          Energy, Gas Mileage and Hybrid Cars (Multidisciplinary Engineering)

          Metrology: Measurement tools & Techniques Lab

          Electrical & Computer Engineering at Fairfield

          Electrical Circuit Analysis (MatLab Use & Programming)

          Manufacturing Engineering at Fairfield

          Software Engineering at Fairfield

          Electronic Circuit Design [Lab]

          Digital Logic Circuits (Multisym)

          Mechanics: Stress and Strain

          Systematic Design Process

Design/Research Content Topics: Circuit Design Lab, Design Process Lectures

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Jeffrey N. Denenberg


1.  Course number and name: EG 32 – Fundamentals of Engineering 2

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Jeffrey N. Denenberg

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Exploring Engineering, Kosky/Wiss/Balmer/Keat, 2010

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This two-course sequence provides core knowledge and competencies in engineering and computer science to engineering students in their first year. Topics include computer-based computational skills, principles of engineering design and software design, digital logic and programming, laboratory data acquisition and reporting, along with probability and statistical analysis of data, design analysis techniques, implementation of engineering projects. In EG 32, hands-on team projects are core learning experiences. They are structured to introduce students to the implementation of principles of design and engineering methodologies, system engineering management, and presentation skills. Guest presenters and field trips augment these courses, which are taught by interdisciplinary faculty teams.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Co-requisites: PS 15, PS 16

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Prepare a user need statement for a hardware or software design

          Maintain a continuing archive of team meeting notes

          Create function and morphological matrices

          Write design specification requirements

          Identify test, demonstration, measurement, or analysis for the verification of design requirements

          Prepare and present a team design review

          Prepare an engineering design report

          Prepare an engineering lab report including tabulation and charting of data

          Conduct a basic analysis with the aid of Mathcad

6b. This course supports student outcomes: a, b, c, d, e, g, k, i

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Intro and Digital Logic Review

          Systematic Design Process

          Team Design Project Planning

          Digital Logic Circuits Lab (Multisym)

          MathCAD (Units Review)

          Engineering Standards

          Profession Engineer License

          Problem Solving Methods & MS Math

          Materials Testing and Data Reporting Lab

          Computer Networks

          Design Analysis Procedures

          Team Project Verification Testing

          Oral Design Presentation Practice

          Team Design Project Reviews & Reports

Design/Research Content Topics: Freshman team design project and related lectures

 

This syllabus was prepared by: Jeffrey N. Denenberg      


1.  Course number and name: EG 210 – Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Gabor L. Hornyak, Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CRC Press 2009.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Neal Stephenson, Diamond Age (1995)

o        Michael Crichton, Prey (2002)

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course will provide a highly interdisciplinary introduction to the science of nanoscale materials (nanoscience). The course will survey the new field of nanoscience/nanotechnology, aiming to motivate interest and heighten awareness of this field. Its many potential applica­tions in medicine, biology, electronics and optoelectronics, engineering, materials science and chemistry, open a broad new horizon of an exciting technology to serve societal needs. Topics will include historical background, characterization techniques, physics and chemistry of nanoscale materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods, nanoscale applications (nanotechnology) and ethical/societal considerations. Intended for all students.

 

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: none

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Demonstrate a basic understanding of the unique properties of nanomaterials, and how nanomaterials/devices are fabricated.

          Demonstrate a basic understanding of the concepts of nanotechnology.

          Demonstrate a basic understanding of nanotechnology applications.

          Develop effective communication and collaboration skills in interdisciplinary groups.

          Demonstrate competency in evaluating topics in the emerging field of nanomaterials

          Demonstrate a basic understanding of the principles of characterization of nanomaterials and their applicaton to nanotechnology (e.g., electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, spectroscopy).

          Demonstrate awareness of research and advances in nanotechnology

           

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, e, f, g, h, i, j

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Definition of Nanotechnology

          Interdisciplinary Nature of Nanotechnology and Applications

          Concepts of Materials Science

          Characterization of Nanomaterials

          Optics at the Nanoscale

          Atomic Force Microscope Lab, Scanning Electron Microscope Lab

          Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Nanostructures

          Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson

          Nano-Fluidics and low Reynolds Number Systems

          Self-Assembly

          Fundamental Principles of Nanobiotechnology

          Nanotoxicology & Nano-Ethics

          Prey, by Michael Crichton

          The Quantum World at the Nanoscale

          Design/Research Content Topic: Students research a topic of interest in nanotechnology and prepare a 30 minute presentation for the class on their topic.  They must reference at least 3 sources (i.e. journal articles), and prepare a written summary in addition to the oral presentation.

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1.  Course number and name: EG 212 – Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology II

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Ryan Munden

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Gabor L. Hornyak, Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CRC Press 2009.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course will continue a highly interdisciplinary, mathematically-based, overview providing a solid foundation in nanoscale materials, techniques, and applications (nanoscience).The course will continue to broadly survey the new field of nanoscience/nanotechnology. Its many potential applications in medicine, biology, electronics and optoelectronics, engineering, materials science and chemistry, open a broad new horizon to an exciting technology to serve societal needs. Topics of discussion such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, MEMS and nanobiology will be reinforced through hands on laboratory experience with nanomaterial synthesis, device fabrication techniques, and characterization methods. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology.

 

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: EG 210 (prereq)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Elective

 

6a. Specific Outcomes:

          Explain how the structure of materials and devices can be controlled down to the nanometer scale through various processing and fabrication methods.

          Compare and contrast property-performance relationships for devices and systems based on nanotechnology.

          Study applications involving nanostructured materials.

          Develop an understanding of how methods of materials, device, and system characterization are used to determine structure-property relationships.

          Develop effective communication skills in interdisciplinary groups

          Collaborate with peers from other disciplines as well as from their own discipline.

          Gain confidence as students and professionals in the study and critical evaluation of research and advances in nanotechnology.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, c, e, f, g, h, i, j


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Nanotechnology: Brief History and Applications

          Concepts of Material Science

          Nanostructures

          Quantum Laws

          Nanomaterials Characterization

          Synthesis/Fabrication of Nanostructures

          Electronics/Optoelectronics

          MEMS/NEMS/Fluidics

          Quantum Dots

          Quantum Rods- Synthesis and Applications

          Self Assembly Revisited

          Nanobiotechnology

          Design/Research Content Topic: Students research a topic of interest in nanotechnology and prepare a 30 minute presentation for the class on their topic.  They must reference at least 3 sources (i.e. journal articles), and prepare a written summary in addition to the oral presentation.

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Ryan Munden      

 


1. Course number and name: EG 233 - Biomedical Visualization

 

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, Enderle et al,  2005.

4a. Other Supplemental Material:  Image Processing in Java, Lyon, 1997.

5a. Course Description:

An introduction to 3D biomedical visualization. Various technologies are introduced, including ultrasound, MRI, CAT scans, PET scans, etc. Students will learn about spatial data structures, computational geometry and solid modeling with applications in 3D molecular and anatomical modeling.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: Prerequisite: CS232 or equivalent

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

6a. Specific Outcomes:

OC1       Students demonstrate the ability to implement a practical visualizalization.

OC2.     Students build a program for biomedical visualization

OC3.    Students make use of library resources to review the literature in the field.

 

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k

7. Topics:

          Medical imagining, such as MRI, CT scans,

          Three-dimensional animation of human anatomy

          Modeling and visualization of biological molecules,

          Various software packages for biomedical visualization purpose

          Various databases of molecular models

          3-D illustration and animation techniques and related software

          Emerging and cutting edge devices that give information to a doctor or a scientist.

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman


1.  Course number and name: MA 125 – Calculus I: Physics and Engineering Majors

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: John David

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Thomas Calculus, Weir, Hass, Giordano , 2008

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

 

5a. Catalog Description: This course covers analytic geometry, continuous functions, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions, product and chain rules, implicit functions, extrema and curve sketching, indefinite and definite integrals, and applications of derivatives and anti-derivatives.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: It is recommended that students not enroll in MA125 unless they have a solid background in high school algebra and pre-calculus.

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

6b. This course supports student outcomes:     a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Analytic geometry

          Functions, graphs

          Derivatives of algebraic functions

          Differentiation trig functions

          Chain rule, Implicit Differentiation

          Applications of Differentiation

          Maxima and curve sketching

          Integrals

          Applications of Integration

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

       

This syllabus was prepared by: ____J. David / D. Dlugos________________   


1.  Course number and name: MA 126 – Calculus II for Physics and Engineering Majors

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Bill Pertusi

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Calculus, James Stewart

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course covers exponential and logarithmic functions, their derivatives and their integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications to area, arc length, and volumes of revolution; hyperbolic functions, inverse trigonometric functions; methods of integration by substitution and parts; and indeterminate forms and improper integrals.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  MA 125 (Prerequisites)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Demonstrate a firm grasp of functions, particularly exponential and other inverse functions, and what it means to model (describe) some process using a function

          Understand and be able to apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (how the derivative and the integral are related)

          Understand the various techniques for solving integrals

          Apply the integral to solving practical problems

          Apply the understanding of integration and functions to solving basic differential equations

          Communicate an understanding of the above in both written and verbal form during the semester

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Applications of Integration

          Inverse Functions

          Techniques of Integration

          Further Applications of Integration

          Differential Equations

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ____W. Pertusi / D. Dlugos________________               

 
1.  Course number and name:
MA 227 – Calculus 3

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: John David

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Calculus, Thomas and Finney , 11 ed

4a. Other Supplemental Material:  N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Topics include infinite series, tests for convergence, power series, Taylor series, geometry in three-space; partial differentiation of continuous functions; chain rule, exact differentials, maxima and minima, multiple integration; application to volumes, center of gravity; and polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: MA 126 or MA 172 or equivalent

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective:    Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

6b. This course supports student outcomes:      a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Basic integration formulas

          Integration by parts

          Partial fractions

          Trigonometric integrals and substitutions

          Integral tables, Computer algebra and Monte Carlo

          Sequences and Infinite series

          The Integral and comparison test

          The ratio and root tests, alternating series, absolute and conditional convergence

          Power series, Taylor and Maclaurin series

          Convergence of Taylor series, error estimate

          Application of power series

          Fourier series

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

This syllabus was prepared by: ____J. David / D. Dlugos________________   


1.  Course number and name: MA 228 – Calculus IV: Physics and Engineering Majors

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: John David

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year Thomas Calculus, Weir, Hass, Giordano, 2008

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Topics in this course include: Vector arithmetic and algebra, dot and cross products, parametric equations, line and planes; gradient, directional derivative, curl, divergence;  line integrals, work, Greens theorem, surface integrals; Stokes and divergence theorems.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  MA227 or MA271 or equivalent

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          The typical student will be able to do the majority of the text exercises successfully

          The typical student will gain a greater understanding in his other courses, due to increased mathematical proficiency

          The typical student will have an improved ability to tackle new material that involves Mathematical methods

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Multiple Integrals

          Areas, Moments and Centers of Mass

          Double Integrals in Polar Form

          Triple Integrals in Rectangular Coordinates

          Triple Integrals in 3 dimensions

          Substitutions in Multiple Integrals

          Line Integrals

          Vector Fields and Work, Vector functions and motion

          Paths and Potentials

          Green's Theorem

          Surface Area and Integrals

          Parameterization of surfaces

          Stokes' Theorem

          The Divergence Theorem

          Determinants and Cramer's Rule

          Partial Derivatives

          Differentiability and Differentials

          The Chain Rule

          Partial Derivatives with Constraints

          Directional Derivatives and Gradients

          Extreme values and Saddle points

          Lagrange multipliers

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: _______ J. David / D. Dlugos____________    

 


1.  Course number and name: MA 321 – Ordinary Differential Equations

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Daniel F. Dlugos

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: A First Course in Differential Equations, Dennis G. Zill, 2001

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Thomas Calculus, Finney, Weir, Giordano,  2005

o        Advanced Engineering Mathematics– E Kreyszig, 2006

o        Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists - Schaums Outline Series, Murray Spiegel, 1971

o        Modern Introductory Differential Equations - Schaums Outline Series, Richard Bronson, 1973

o        Laplace Transforms – Schaums Outline Series, Murry R. Spiegel, 1965

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course presents solutions of the first order differential equations and of higher order linear differential equations; power series solutions; Laplace transforms; and a multitude of applications.

 5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: MA225, MA227 or MA271 or equivalent (Prerequisite)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will demonstrate the ability to apply classic methods to first and second order differential equations

          Students will demonstrate their understanding of the problem solving process in their clear and logical presentation of their solution methods.

          Students will demonstrate the ability to apply classic operator solution methods to solve a variety of engineering and physics problems.

          Students will demonstrate the solution of a simple system of linear equation problems.

          Students will show they can solve differential equation solutions by power series method

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Introduction to differential equations

          Applications of First-order differential equations

           Linear differential equations of higher order

          Differential Operators

          Simple Harmonic Motion

          Differential Equations Variable Coefficients

          Cauchy-Euler equations

          Laplace Transform

          Translation theorems and derivatives of a transform

          Systems of linear differential equations

          Matrices

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: _______ Daniel F. Dlugos _____________         

 


1.  Course number and name: ME 201 – Statics

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Michael Zabinski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Vector Mechanics for Engineers – Statics, Ferdinand P. Beer and E. Russell Johnston, Mc Graw-Hill, 2009

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

5a. Catalog Description:

This introduction to rigid body mechanics using vector representation covers free body

diagrams and static equilibrium in two- and three-dimensional space; solves problems in

trusses, frames, and simple mechanisms; and develops methods in problem-solving

techniques using computer-based approaches.  The course integrates computer-aided analysis

 and design tools ensuring relevance to the Statics problems.

 Students perform lab experiments to support lecture theories and prepare professional-level

reports.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  Prerequisite: PS 15, PS 15L, EG 31, MA 126

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will be skilled problem solvers

          Students will be able to work together in teams to conduct projects

          Students will be proficient in organizing material in preparation for tests

          Students will be familiar and have experience with the process of design

          Students will master the topics covered in the course and be prepared for advanced courses, e.g., ME 203.

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, e, g, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Addition & Resolution of Forces

          Equilibrium of a Particle

          Forces in Space

          Equilibrium in Space

          Vector Product.  Moment of a Force about a Point

          Scalar Product.  Moment of a Force about an Axis

          Couples

          Equivalent Systems of Forces

          Equilibrium in Two Dimensions

          Two- and Three-Force Bodies

          Equilibrium in Three Dimensions

          Centroids & First Moments

          Centroids by Integration

          Beams & Submerged Surfaces

          Centroids of Volumes

          Trusses:  Method of Joints

          Trusses:  Method of Sections

          Analysis of Frames

          Analysis of Machines

          Internal Forces in Members

          Beams

          Laws of Friction

          Wedges

          Belt Friction

          Moments of Inertia of Areas

          Composite Areas

          Product of Inertia

          Mohr's Circle

          Design/Research Content Topic:

                   Factor of safety, design specifications, design of trusses under various

                   loading conditions, design vs. economy considerations, design vs. safety

                   considerations, ethical considerations in design.

     

This syllabus was prepared by: Michael Zabinski                


1.  Course number and name: ME 203 – Kinematics and Dynamics

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Stephen Roux

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics, Beer & Johnston, 2009

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course presents kinematics principles applied to particles and rigid body elements. Topics include analysis of forces and motion using Newtons second and third laws of motion; theory of kinetics of particles and rigid body elements under rectilinear and curvilinear motion, vector methods; principles of work, energy, and power; and momentum and impact. The course integrates computer-aided analysis and design tools, ensuring relevance to the kinematics and dynamics problems.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  Prerequisites: ME 201, MA227

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will determine the position, velocity and acceleration of a particle in one, two and three dimensions in rectilinear and curvilinear motion.

          Students will develop the relationship between the velocity and acceleration of a particle with their tangential and normal components or their radial and transverse components.

          Students will apply  Newtons second law of motion to relate the forces acting on a particle to the motion of the particle

          Students will determine whether all of the forces acting on a particle are conservative and will calculate the potential and kinetic energies of the particle and forces at each end of the path of the particles motion.

          Students will integrate Newtons second law to obtain the principle of impulse and momentum for a particle.

          Students will solve the impact of two bodies, total momentum of the two bodies, and relative velocities of the two bodies before and after the impact.

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, e

 




7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Kinematics of particles: Rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles.

          Kinetics of particles:  Newtons second law.

          Kinetics of particles: Energy and momentum methods.

          System of particles: Linear and angular momentum, kinetic energy and principle of impulse and momentum for a system.

          Kinematics of rigid bodies:  Translation, rotation, plane motion and general motion.

          Plane motion of rigid bodies:  Forces and accelerations.

          Plane motion of rigid bodies:  Energy and momentum methods.

          Mechanical Vibrations

          Design/Research Content Topic:

      

This syllabus was prepared by: Stephen Roux       


1.  Course number and name: ME 203 – Kinematics and Dynamics

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Michael Zabinski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Dynamics, Beer & Johnston, 2009

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This course presents kinematics principles applied to particles and rigid body elements. Topics include analysis of forces and motion using Newtons second and third laws of motion; theory of kinetics of particles and rigid body elements under rectilinear and curvilinear motion, vector methods; principles of work, energy, and power; and momentum and impact. The course integrates computer-aided analysis and design tools, ensuring relevance to the kinematics and dynamics problems.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  ME 201 (Prerequisites)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will be skilled problem solvers.

          Students will be able to work together in teams to conduct projects.

          Students will be proficient in organizing material in preparation for tests.

          Students will be familiar and have experience with the process of design.

          Students will master the topics covered in the course and be prepared for advanced courses, e.g., ME 280.

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, e, f, g, k

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Rectilinear Motion

          Uniformly Accelerated  Motion

          Curvilinear Motion (Rect. Comps.)

          Curvilinear Motion (Other Comp.)

          Equations of Motion

          Angular Momentum

          Work and Energy, Power

          Conservation of Energy

          Impulse and Momentum

          Impact         

          Systems of Particles

          Translation, Rotation

          General Plane Motion

          Instantaneous Center

          Acceleration in Plane Motion

          Plane Motion of Rigid Bodies

          Constrained Plane Motion

          Work and Energy

          Impulse and Momentum

          Eccentric Impact

          Design/Research Content Topic:

                   Factor of safety, design specifications, design vs. economy considerations,

                   design vs. safety considerations, ethical considerations in design.

 

This syllabus was prepared by: Michael Zabinski

 


1.  Course number and name: ME 206L – Mechanics Laboratory

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Michael Zabinski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: ME 206L Laboratory Manual, Fairfield University, 2010

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Students do mechanics experiments for two- and three-dimensional structures under static loading conditions. Concepts include vectors, equilibrium, moments, truss analysis, forces, and center of gravity of objects. This course includes topics in engineering materials, such as hardness, toughness, microscopic analysis, machinability and thermal properties. The course introduces strain gages, instrumentation and statistical data analysis. Students perform experiments and prepare laboratory reports.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  Co-requisite: ME201

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students can prepare accurate and comprehensive Excel data sheets, showing sources of error, both systematic and random

          Students demonstrate high quality data management and graphical representation using Excel

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data

          Students use proper format for preparing lab reports

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results

          Additional outcomes are listed for each experiment in the laboratory manual

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, e, g, j

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Organization and Excel

          Equilibrium of Forces

          Strain Hardening Cycling Loading

          Torsional Stress/Strain and Angle of Twist

          Deformation of Single and Multi-Member Beams and start

          Truss Bridge Design Activity

          IC Hardness Tester and III C: Truss Bridge Design Activity

          Force Analyzing Trusses

          Modeling and Design Activity

          Design/Research Content Topics:

                   Factor of safety, design specifications, design for impact loads, design of

                   beams under various loading conditions, design to satisfy various stress

                   conditions, design for conditions beyond the elastic limit, design of trusses

                   subject to various loads selection of metals of different properties for design

                    under special conditions, design vs. economy considerations, design vs. safety

                   considerations.

 

             This syllabus was prepared by: Michael Zabinski            

 


1.  Course number and name: ME 307L – Dynamics Systems Laboratory

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Michael Zabinski

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Fairfield University ME 307.L Laboratory Manual, 2011

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

Students perform experiments covering the concepts of kinematics, dynamics, and mechanisms. Concepts included are: Newtons Laws, momentum, mechanical energy, impact, and friction. The course includes concepts in the area of strength of materials, such as: stress, strain, loading, modulus of elasticity, and fatigue. It also covers analysis of beams, photoelastic studies, and statistical data analysis. Students complete written lab reports.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  Co-requisite: ME203, ME308

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students can prepare accurate and comprehensive Excel data sheets, showing sources of error, both systematic and random.

          Students demonstrate high quality data management and graphical representation using Excel.

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data.

          Students use proper format for preparing lab reports.

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results.

          Additional outcomes are listed for each experiment in the laboratory manual

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a, b, e, g, j

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Excel Project

          Conservation of Linear Momentum

          Conservation of Mechanical Energy

          Kinetic Friction

          Conservation of Linear and Angular Momentum

          Rotating Shaft Fatigue Failures

          Stress and Strain Concentration in a Cantilever Beam

          Dynamic Failures of Beams with Stress Concentration

          Shear Stress for Cantilever Flexure

          Design/Research Content Topic:

                  Factor of safety, design specifications, design of  beams under various loading

                   conditions, design to satisfy various stress conditions,  design of members

                   subject to stress concentration, selection of metals of different properties for

                   design under special conditions, design of trusses under various loading

                   conditions design vs. economy considerations, design vs. safety

                   considerations.

 

 

       This syllabus was prepared by: Michael Zabinski

 

 

 


1.  Course number and name: PS 15 – General Physics I

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Jack W. Beal

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: University Physics, Vol. 1, Young and Freedman, 2008.

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        Masteringphysics.com,

o        Study Guide,

o        Students Solution Manual, 2008

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This introductory course -- for students concentrating in physics, mathematics, chemistry, or engineering – covers mechanics, heat and fluid dynamics. It also includes rigorous mathematical derivations using integral and differential calculus. Topics include velocity and acceleration, Newtons laws of motion, work, energy, power, momentum, torque, elastic properties of solids, fluids at rest and in motion, properties of gasses, measurement and transfer of heat, and elementary thermodynamics.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  N/A

 

5c. Required/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          The student will develop an understanding and acquire proficiency in solving problems in the following areas:

o        Motion in one and two dimensions with constant acceleration – kinematics

o        Newtons laws of motion – statics and dynamics

o        Work, kinetic and potential energy, and conservation of energy

o        Linear momentum

o        Torques, rotational motion and angular momentum

o        Basics of heat and thermodynamics

o        Introduction to solid materials

o        Introduction to fluids

          Scientific Literacy

          Critical thinking skills

          Quantitative analysis and research methods

o         

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Units, Physical Quantities, and Vectors

          Motion Along a Straight Line

          Motion in Two or Three Dimensions

          Newtons Laws of Motion

          Applying Newtons Laws

          Work and Kinetic Energy

          Potential Energy and Energy Conversion

          Momentum, Impulse, and Collisions

          Rotation of Rigid Bodies

          Rolling, Torque and Angular Momentum

          Equilibrium and Elasticity

          Fluids

          Temperature and Heat

          1st Law of Thermodynamics

          2nd Law of Thermodynamics

      

This syllabus was prepared by:  Jack W. Beal


1.  Course number and name: PS 15L – General Physics I Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Laboratory Manual for Physics Experiments, part 1, Fairfield University 2010

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        University Physics, Young and Freedman

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This lab course engages students in experimental measurements spanning the areas of mechanics and thermal stresses on matter, with the objective of training students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation, providing depth to students' understanding of the phenomena taught in PS 15. Specific experimental measurements include accelerated motion, periodic motion, gravitational force, ballistics, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational dynamics, and measurements of the coefficient of linear expansion and the heat of fusion. Students complete a weekly lab report.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  PS 15 (Co-requisites)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will demonstrate their knowledge in the area of mechanics and thermal stresses on matter

          Students will demonstrate their ability to apply error analysis

          Students demonstrate use an appropriate format for preparing lab reports

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a,b,d,k

 


7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Force Table Vectors

          Measurement of the Acceleration of an Object Due to Gravity

          Measurements of g with Simple Pendulum

          Conservation of Energy

          The Ballistic Pendulum and Projectile Motion

          Conservation of Linear Momentum

          Harmonic Motion

          Centripetal Force

          Linear Thermal Expansion of Solids

          Heat and Fusion

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: ____ Cristian Craciun ________


1.  Course number and name: PS 16General Physics II

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Angela Biselli

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Sears and Zemanskys University Physics, Young and Freedman, 2008

 

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        N/A

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This continuation of  PS15 covers electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and sound. Topics include magnetism and electricity; simple electric circuits; electrical instruments; generators and motors; characteristics of wave motion; light and illumination; reflection; refraction, interference; polarization of light, color and the spectrum; and production and detection of sound waves.

 

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: PS15 (not in catalog)

 

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          The student will develop an understanding of and acquire proficiency in solving problems in the following:

o        Electric charge, electric field and electric potential

o        DC  circuits

o        Magnetic forces and magnetic field

o        Faradays law and inductance

o        Periodic motion

o        Electromagnetic waves and propagation of light

o        Geometric optics

6b. This course supports student outcomes:  a

 

7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Electric charge and electric field

          Electric potential

          Capacitance and dielectrics

          Current, resistance and electromotive force

          DC circuits

          Magnetic field and magnetic forces

          Sources of magnetic forces

          Electromagnetic induction

          Periodic motion

          Mechanical waves

          Sound

          Electromagnetic waves and propagation of light

          Geometric optics

          Design/Research Content Topic:

 

      

This syllabus was prepared by: _____ Angela Biselli / D. Dlugos_______________      


 

 

1.  Course number and name: PS 16L – General Physics II Lab

 

2.  Credits and contact hours: 1 credits, 30hours

 

3.  Instructors name: Cristian Craciun

 

4.  Text book, title, author, and year: Laboratory Manual for Physics Experiments, part 2, Fairfield University 2010

4a. Other Supplemental Material:

o        University Physics, Young and Freedman

 

5a. Catalog Description:

This lab course provides students whit a greater understanding of electromagnetic phenomena, wave phenomena, and optics, and support PS16. Measurement of microscopic quantities like the charge and mass of the electron, give students an opportunity to explore the structure of matter. Other experiments involve the physic of electrical currents, electric property of bulk matter, electromagnet fields and their effect on beams, wave phenomena, and the nature of light and its interaction with optical materials. This course rain students in experimental measurements, data manipulation and analysis, error analysis, deductive thinking, and instrumentation. Students complete a weekly lab report.

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites:  PS 16 (Co-requisites)

 5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Required

 

6a.  Specific Outcomes:

          Students will demonstrate their knowledge in the area electrical and electronics

          Students will demonstrate their ability to apply error analysis.

          Students apply correct calculations using theoretical concepts and collected data.

          Students demonstrate use an appropriate format for preparing lab reports.

          Students demonstrate an ability to verify experimental results.

 

6b. This course supports student outcomes:a,b,d,k

 

          7.    Brief List of Topics:

          Electric charge and electric field

          Electric potential

          Capacitance and dielectrics

          Current, resistance and electromotive force

          DC circuits

          Magnetic field and magnetic forces

          Sources of magnetic forces

          Electromagnetic induction

          Periodic motion

          Mechanical waves

          Sound

          Electromagnetic waves and propagation of light

          Geometric optics

          Design/Research Content Topic:   

 

This syllabus was prepared by: _____ C. Craciun _______________

 

 


1. Course number and name: SW410 - Enterprise Java

2. Credits and contact hours: 3 credits, 45 contact hours

 

3. Instructors name:  Dr. Doug Lyon

4. Text book: Java for Programmers, by D. Lyon, Prentice Hall, 2004.

5a. Course Description:

This course will explore server-side Java technologies in a structured manner. Students will be exposed to the latest in Java technologies and APIs (JSPs, XML, DOM, Servlets, JDBC, EJBs etc).

5b. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: SW409 or permission of instructor

5c. Require/Elective/Selective Elective: Selective Elective

6a. Specific Outcomes:

OC1: Students will write programs.

OC2: Student will use cutting edge technologies.

OC3: Students will perform exercises based on the presentations to make sure that they understand the technologies.

6b. This course supports Criterion 3 student outcomes: a, c, e, k

7. Topics:

1. Review of basics

2. Annotation/reflection

3. Network Programming

4. JDBC

5. Servlets

6. JSP

7. XML/More XML Techniques

8. Midterm

9. Jaxb and data mining

10. Bean Properties

11. Introduction to Enterprise Java Beans

12. EJB Container

13. Session Beans

14. Session Bean Deployment

 

This syllabus was prepared by:  Doug Lyon and Carl Weiman